“I have grown in so many areas, becoming sociable and much more aware of my environment. The Programme helps in areas of your personal life and prepares you for the future.”

~ Bijin Jean (C. V. Bethel participant)

“I have grown in so many areas, becoming sociable and much more aware of my environment. The Programme helps in areas of your personal life and prepares you for the future.”

~ Bijin Jean (C. V. Bethel participant)

The original inspiration for the Award came
from Dr Kurt Hahn, who also thought up
Outward Bound, United World Colleges and Round Square. Kurt Hahn had been a Rhodes Scholar and Private Secretary to the last Imperial German Chancellor before becoming a schoolmaster. He founded a boarding school at Salem in Germany and then, having fled Germany in the early 1930s, founded a school named Gordonstoun in Scotland. The Duke of Edinburgh was one of the first pupils at the school.

There are ten guiding principles that underpin the philosophy of the Award.  They are designed to ensure that a young person has a meaningful and purposeful journey through their Award, as well as ensuring that the impact of achieving their Award provides a lasting personal legacy.

The Award’s guiding principles are as follows:

Guiding Principles

  1. Individual – Individuals design their own prgramme, which can be tailored to suit their personal circumanstances, choices and local provision. They start at whichever level suits them best and they can take as long as they wish (within  the age limit) to achieve the Award.

 

  2. Non-competitive – Doing their Award is a personal challenge and not a competition against others. Every participant’s programme is tailor-made to reflect their individual starting point, abilities and interests.

 

  3. Achievable – An Award is achievable by any individual who chooses to take up the challenge, regardless of ability, gender, background or location, with the right guidance and inspiration.

 

  4. Voluntary – Whilst the Award may be offered within school, college, work time, custody or extra-curricula activity, individuals choose to do a programme and must commit a substantial amount of their free time to undertake their activities.

 

  5. Developmental – Participating in their Award programme fosters personal and social development. Individuals gain valuable experiences and life skills, grow in confidence and become more aware of their environment and community, transforming them into responsible young adults.

 

  6. Balanced – The Award provides a balanced framework to develop the individual’s mind, body and community spirit by engaging them in four activities at Bronze and Silver levels, and five activities at Gold level.

 

  7. Progressive – At each level, the Award demands progressively more time, commitment and responsibility from the participant.

 

  8. Inspirational – The Award inspires individuals to exceed their expectations. They are encouraged to set their own challenges and goals before starting an activity, aim for these goals and by showing improvement, will move towards achieving an Award.

 

  9. Persistence – The Award requires persistence and cannot be completed with a short burst of enthusiasm. Participants are encouraged to continue with activities and to maintain their interest beyond their programme requirements.

 

  10. Enjoyable – Participants and Leaders should find the Award enjoyable, fufilling and rewarding.

 

GUIDING PRINCIPLES
1. Individual

Individuals design their own prgramme, which can be tailored to suit their personal circumanstances, choices and local provision. They start at whichever level suits them best and they can take as long as they wish (within  the age limit) to achieve the Award.

2. Non-competitive

Doing their Award is a personal challenge and not a competition against others. Every participant’s programme is tailor-made to reflect their individual starting point, abilities and interests.

3. Achievable

An Award is achievable by any individual who chooses to take up the challenge, regardless of ability, gender, background or location, with the right guidance and inspiration.

4. Voluntary

Whilst the Award may be offered within school, college, work time, custody or extra-curricula activity, individuals choose to do a programme and must commit a substantial amount of their free time to undertake their activities.

5. Developmental

Participating in their Award programme fosters personal and social development. Individuals gain valuable experiences and life skills, grow in confidence and become more aware of their environment and community, transforming them into responsible young adults.

6. Balanced

The Award provides a balanced framework to develop the individual’s mind, body and community spirit by engaging them in four activities at Bronze and Silver levels, and five activities at Gold level.

7. Progressive

At each level, the Award demands progressively more time, commitment and responsibility from the participant.

8. Inspirational

The Award inspires individuals to exceed their expectations. They are encouraged to set their own challenges and goals before starting an activity, aim for these goals and by showing improvement, will move towards achieving an Award.

9. Persistence

The Award requires persistence and cannot be completed with a short burst of enthusiasm. Participants are encouraged to continue with activities and to maintain their interest beyond their programme requirements.

10. Enjoyable

Participants and Leaders should find the Award enjoyable, fufilling and rewarding.

SAFEGUARDING & CODE OF CONDUCT
3.1 Introduction

3.2 Safeguarding Policy

3.3 Code of Conduct

SAFEGUARDING & CODE OF CONDUCT
3.1 Introduction

3.2 Safeguarding Policy

3.3 Code of Conduct

The Award can play a vital role in providing opportunities for young people to develop essential universal life skills, complementing their formal education or things they are learning in the workplace. This enables them to grow in confidence and in their ability to contribute positively to their communities. The Award’s success and flexibility is evidenced by the fact that it has spread to more than 130 countries and territories. Drawing on previous research undertaken on the Award and other youth organisations and existing research and recommendations on the outcomes of non-formal education, the Foundation has developed a description for the outcomes of the Award for young people. It has been found that the Award helps young people develop the following social and emotional capabilities:

Award Outcomes

   1. Confidence – Self-reliance, self-esteem, self-efficacy, capacity to act in one’s own interest
and need, self-belief and ability to shape your own life and the world
around you.

 

   2. Resilience and determination – Self-disciplined, self-management, self-motivated, focused, having a sense of
purpose, persistent, self-controlled etc.

 

   3. Relationships and leadership. – Motivating others, valuing and contributing to team working, negotiating,

establishing positive relationships, interpreting others, managing conflict,
empathising etc.

 

   4. Creativity and adaptability – Imagining alternative ways of doing things, applying learning in new contexts,
enterprising, innovating, remaining open to new ideas, reading situations
correctly and adapting as required.

 

 5. Planning and problem solving – Navigating resources, organising, setting and achieving goals; decisionmaking,
researching, analysing, critical thinking, questioning and challenging,
evaluating risks, reliability.

 

 6. Managing feelings – Reviewing, self-awareness, self-control, reflecting, self-regulating, selfaccepting

 

 7. Communication – Explaining, expressing, presenting, listening, questioning, using different
ways of communicating.

 

 8. Personal and social well-being – A person’s state of mind, relationship with the world around them and the
fulfilment they get from life: well-being, life satisfaction.

 

 9. Civic competence – The ability and willingness to engage in active participation, based on an
attitude of trust in other people, in all the contexts of social life: school, local
community, working place, recreational activities.

 

 10. Intercultural competence – Ability to operate in different cultural settings (of different ages, skills,
religions, languages, etc.) and adaptability to changing circumstances and
ability to sense and respond to new contexts.

 

AWARD OUTCOMES
1. Confidence

Self-reliance, self-esteem, self-efficacy, capacity to act in one’s own interest
and need, self-belief and ability to shape your own life and the world
around you.

2. Resilience and determination

Self-disciplined, self-management, self-motivated, focused, having a sense of
purpose, persistent, self-controlled etc.

3. Relationships and leadership

Motivating others, valuing and contributing to team working, negotiating,
establishing positive relationships, interpreting others, managing conflict,
empathising etc.

4. Creativity and adaptability

Imagining alternative ways of doing things, applying learning in new contexts,
enterprising, innovating, remaining open to new ideas, reading situations
correctly and adapting as required.

5. Planning and problem solving

Navigating resources, organising, setting and achieving goals; decisionmaking,
researching, analysing, critical thinking, questioning and challenging,
evaluating risks, reliability.

6. Managing feelings

Reviewing, self-awareness, self-control, reflecting, self-regulating, selfaccepting
etc.

7. Communication

Explaining, expressing, presenting, listening, questioning, using different
ways of communicating.

8. Personal and social well-being

A person’s state of mind, relationship with the world around them and the
fulfilment they get from life: well-being, life satisfaction.

9. Civic competence

The ability and willingness to engage in active participation, based on an
attitude of trust in other people, in all the contexts of social life: school, local
community, working place, recreational activities.

10. Intercultural competence

Ability to operate in different cultural settings (of different ages, skills,
religions, languages, etc.) and adaptability to changing circumstances and
ability to sense and respond to new contexts.

The Award has developed a number of impact measures by examining existing research and evidence on its effectiveness as a youth development programme. Much  of this evidence is based on young people’s own reports of how doing their Award has transformed their outlook. It also takes into account the views of employers, ducational institutions, parents and youth leaders. The impact measures have been benchmarked against international frameworks such as the UN Sustainable Development Goals, and against the development objectives of regional and international organisations such as the Commonwealth Youth Programme.

The Award’s seven impact measures are:

The Award’s seven impact measures are:

 1. Improved employability and earning potential – Increase in employability and earning potential due to improved life skills

2. Improved physical health and fitness  – Improved physical health due to increased long-term participation in physical activities.

3. Improved mental health and emotional wellbeing – Improved mental health and emotional wellbeing dut to increased social interaction, self-confidence, enhanced life skills and sense of power.

4. Increased engagement with charitable and community causes  Increased engagement with charitable and community causes directly, through the Voluntary Service section of the Award, and indirectly, through increased likelihood of long-term participation in volunteering and other forms of community and local      participation.

5. Improved environmental impact  Increase in positive, or reduction in nagative, environmental impacts as a result of behaviour change resulting from being more aware of environmental issues and having increased connection with and compassion for nature.

6. Increased social cohesion  Increased social inclusion and community cohesion, not specifically captured by the other impacts in the framework. This encompasses the resources and relationships provided by people and society, including skills, knowledge, wellbeing, relationships, shared values and institutions.

7. Reduced offending  Reduction in first-term offending and reduction in reoffending by young offenders, due to long-term increased levels of physical activity, improved life skills, increased social inclusion and improved social skills resulting from increased levels of social interaction.

You have the power today to change tomorrow with GGYA!

We are EMPOWERING YOUTH to be #WorldReady!

Participating in the GGYA as a Volunteer, Leader or Donor helps us to prepare the young people of the Bahamas to become tomorrow’s leaders!

We are EMPOWERING YOUTH to be #WorldReady!

Participating in the GGYA as a Volunteer, Leader or Donor helps us to prepare the young people of the Bahamas to become tomorrow’s leaders!

FAQ

HELPFUL INFORMATION

Click below to get a quick overview of our most frequently asked questions.

WHO CAN JOIN

The Award is available to young people between the ages of 14 and 24.

HOW DO I JOIN

Enrolment or registration in the Award
commences by mutual agreement between
the participant and their Award Leader or
another suitable adult, for instance the
Award Coordinator. 

In many countries this agreement is usually
marked by the payment of a fee – details
about any fee arrangements are available
either via the national office if you are
working within a licensed NAO, or via the
Foundation if you are working within an IAC.

The registration process also involves the
issuing of a username and password for an
online database. All IACs use the Online
Record Book (ORB). The database varies
between different NAOs, however more and
more are now using the ORB.

Only activities undertaken after a young
person has been registered can count
towards their Award – the Award Leader
and participant therefore must discuss
and agree the start date to ensure that a
participant has all of their activities and
commitment recognised.

WHAT ARE THE REQUIREMENTS

The Award has four sections designed to provide a balanced programme of personal
development and challenge. These sections are as follows:

Voluntary Service – to learn how to give
useful voluntary service to others in
their community.

Skills – to encourage the development
of personal interests, creativity or
practical skills.

Physical Recreation – to encourage
participation in physical recreation and
improvement of performance.

Adventurous Journey – to encourage a spirit of adventure and discovery whilst planning and undertaking a journey in a group.

There is also an additional requirement to complete a Gold Residential Project in order to
achieve the Gold level. The aim of this section is to broaden experience through living and working with others in a residential setting.

The Award Framework

REGISTERED UNITS

NEW PROVDENCE

  • Anatol Rodgers High
  • Aquinas College
  • C. C. Sweeting Sr. High
  • C. R. Walker High
  • C. V. Bethel High
  • C. V. Hart Enhancement Institute
  • Government High
  • Jordan Prince Williams
  • Kingsway Academy
  • Leadership Academy
  • Lyford Cay International
  • Nassau Christian
  • Noble Preparatory
  • Queen’s College
  • R. M Bailey High
  • Royan Bahamas Defence Force Rangers
  • Royal Bahamas Police Cadets
  • St. Augustine’s College
  • St. Barnabas Boy’s Brigade
  • Temple Christiam High School
  • Tambearly School
  • University of the Bahamas
  • Willimae Pratt School for Girls

GRAND BAHAMA

  • Bishop Michael Eldon High
  • Eight Mile Rock High
  • Jack Hayward Sr
  • Lucaya International
  • Mary Star of the Sea Catholic
  • St. George’s High
  • St. Paul’s Methodist
  • Sunland Baptist Academy
  • Tabernacle Chirstian Academy

ANDROS

  • Bahamas Agriculture & Marine Science Institute (BAMSI)
  • Huntley P. Christie High

BERRY ISLANDS

  • R. N. Gomez Comprehensive School

BIMINI

  • Louise McDonald High

ELEUTHERA

  • Harbour Island All Age
  • North Eleuthera
  • Preston H. Albury High

EXUMA

  • L. N. Coakley High
  • St. Andrews Anglican 

INAGUA

  • Inagua All Age

LONG ISLAND

  • N. G. M. Major High

For more information about the unit at each location, you should contact the unit leader (teacher) at each school or call the Award office at 242-326-1760